Learning Progressions for Content Areas

The 6-12 Literacy Standards in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects are spiraling, with an increasing level of difficulty embedded into the each grade-band standard as it approaches the College and Career Readiness Anchor Standard.  These spiraling standards lead to growth along the trajectory of each standard as students study the same skill set yearly, but at ever-increasing increments of complexity and sophistication.  This repeated exposure breaks complex learning expectations into manageable teaching and learning targets.  (Wiggs, 2011). 

The following example of learning progressions shows the evolution of standards from 6-8 to College and Career.  New skills and concepts are featured in bold to indicate their addition to the standard.  Access the entire Content Area Progressions Document

Grades 6-8 Common Core State Standards

Learning Progressions for Content Area Literacy Standards: Reading

 

Anchor Standard

History/Social Studies

Science & Technical Subjects

1.        

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.

2.        

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

3.        

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.

4.        

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

5.        

Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).

Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to an understanding of the topic.

6.        

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text.

7.        

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Integrate visual information (e.g., in

charts, graphs, photographs, videos,

or maps) with other information in

print and digital texts.

Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).

8.        

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Distinguish among fact, opinion, and

reasoned judgment in a text.

Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text.

9.        

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Analyze the relationship between a

primary and secondary source on the

same topic.

Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.

10.     

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

By the end of grade 8, read and

comprehend history/social studies

texts in the grades 6–8 text

complexity band independently and

proficiently.

By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 

 

 

Grades 9-10 Common Core State Standards

Learning Progressions for Content Area Literacy Standards: Reading

 

Anchor Standard

History/Social Studies

Science & Technical Subjects

1.        

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.

2.        

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.

3.        

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks, attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.

4.        

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.

5.        

Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.

Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).

6.        

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the question the author seeks to address.

7.        

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.

8.        

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.

Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or technical problem.

9.        

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from other sources (including their own experiments), noting when the findings support or contradict previous explanations or accounts.

10.     

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 


Grades 11-12 Common Core State Standards

Learning Progressions for Content Area Literacy Standards: Reading

 

Anchor Standard

History/Social Studies

Science & Technical Subjects

1.        

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.

2.        

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.

3.        

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.

4.        

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.

5.        

Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

Analyze how the text structures information or ideas into categories or hierarchies, demonstrating understanding of the information or ideas.

6.        

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved.

7.        

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

8.        

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.

9.        

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

10.     

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11–12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 11–12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

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